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20130421
20130421
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warming into the mid-80s inland. we'll have the forecast in a minute. >>> also ahead, why extra law enforcement in the city of oakland is coming to an end. it is 7:30 on sunday, april 21 april 21st. thanks for joining us. i'm anne makovec. >> and i'm phil matier. we have a lot of news to talk about in the first hour. and first up boston, how prepared is fran and the bay area. we have a lot of events, what are we going to do about it. >> and i spoke with fema about that yesterday, they say the bay area is one of the most prepared areas in the world, still not enough depending on the level of the tragedy. we are also going to be talking about immigration and its effects potentially on the silicon valley. a new bill in congress. >>> what's high-tech at stake when it comes to visas and such. what's it mean to the local job market. meanwhile in boston we have a high level interrogation team. >> trying to talk to the one man alive behind the boston marathons. >> as susan mcginnis tells us that suspect is too seriously injured to speak. >> reporter: law enforcement officers remain staked o
but they will finish warmer. >> also, why law enforcement in the city of oakland is coming to an unfortunate end. it's 8:30 on sunday, april 21st. thank you for joining us. i'm ann. >> and i'm phil. we have a lot of news and coverage. security in the wake of the boston bombing. how will it affect bay area events? >> and we have more on the immigration debate when it comes to the affects on silicon valley. we're in boston with the high- level interrogation team standing by to talk with the one man behind and who they believe is behind the bombings. >> and as susan macinnis tells us, the suspect is too injured to speak. >> reporter: law enforcement officers remain staked out this morning at the boston hospital where dzhokhar tsarnaev is being held under heavy guard waiting to charge him. his injuries are serious. including a bullet wound to the neck that investigators say may have been self-inflicted. >> they say it appears from the wound that he might have stuck the gun to his mouth and fired. >> reporter: that may have happened when police found him hiding in a boat friday night. investigators relea
times writing about what he called immigration fear. country and stronger role of law, passed copperheads of reform. -- past comprehensive reform. then there is this summary from the new york times editorial. there is a better way to be safer. pass an immigration bill if terrorists, drug traffickers, and gang bangers with sharp meters in the immigrant haystack, then shrink the haystack. get 11 million people on the books, find out who they are. the issueur calls on of boy scouts of america we welcome jim to the conversation from oklahoma. good morning. the gay crowd wants to push how they live on uni. they should be able to decide their own rules and the government should be completely out of it. just like the gay marriage thing. if they want to get married, fine. if a certain church doesn't want to marry them, then so be it. the government should stay out of the whole issue. that's it. host: part of the debate this week on what to do with the alleged bomber involved in the killing of three bostonians over this past week. the headline, republicans want the boston bombing suspe
to answer the question of why >> i and i think all the law enforcement professionals are hoping for a host of reasons that the suspect survives because we have a million questions. those questions need to be answered. a justice dept source says dzhokar will will face federal terrorism charges and may also face state murder charges -- adding that he could be charged before he leaves the hospital. in boston i'm stacey cohan reporting. >> federal agents confirm that the f-b-i interviewed the older brother, tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011, after being tipped off by a foreign government. the suspect identified himself as ethnic chechen from southern russia and officials there believed tamerlan was going to travel to the country's region to join unspecified underground groups. the fbi says it interviewed tsarnaev and relatives, and did not find any domestic or foreign terrorism activity. meanwhile, tsarnaev's uncle says he had a falling-out with the 26-year-old over his increased commitment to islam. boston cardinal sean o'malley is dedicating mass today to the bombing victims. it's being held at the
and terrorist groups. leven said to hold him under these circumstances would be contrary to our laws and jeopardize our effort to prosecute him. during interviews before suspects are read their rights is often not admissible during the trial. the issue on miranda rights is further complicated because the u.s. is a u.s. citizen. many of the rules cannot be used on americans. live in the newsroom, katie utehs. ktvu news. >>> people are in texas are being allowed in their homes. curfew is still in effect and there is limited water and electricity. many are still trying to learn the condition of family and friends hurt in the explosion. >> it's really hectic, but we are patient because we know the extent of damage on the other side. and we got friends and family that we don't know about over there. >> 14 people died in the fertilizer plant explosion, including 11 emergency responders. 200 more were injured. >>> this weekend, texas is also remembering the deadly raid on the branch compound in waco. 76 people died in a fire twenty years ago following a raid on the compound. waco and west
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
human rationality. people do all kinds of really stupid things. we enact stupid laws sometimes that a lot of people agree on more because certain interest groups influence others. look at the gun legislation. yeah it's for the failure to enact it is driven by the economic interest of a certain small bunch of businesses but is that really why a huge number of other individuals who believe that's a good thing to do or wildly misinterpret the second amendment because they feel it within themselves. with regard to slavery and you jumped off from that, one of the things that became and has become clear to me the more i have delved into the world of the slave owner it's self and indeed the pre-emancipation north where it wasn't really all that different, is that a lot of people really liked slavery. they liked it. yes it was profitable but it wasn't always all that profitable and a motivator particularly in the 19th century was much of the south it was up into the respectable middle class to own a slave. it gave you a status in the stature that you might not have otherwise so why did
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7